The Management of Research When Research-Technology Management Was Born

By Michael F. Wolff, Executive Editor, RTM (1983-2010)

(This throwback article appeared in RTM twice, first in 1983 and again in 2007 as part of the journal’s 50th anniversary. This year marks the 60th year that RTM has been in continuous publication. #Happy60thRTM!)

In 1958, the industrial boom fueled by the technical advances of the World War II period was only temporarily interrupted by a recession year. The earlier dramatic research advances in computers, chemistry and electronics continued to contribute strongly to the growth of R&D management as a profession—one that brought with it concerns that resonate with those that confront the profession today.

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From the Archives: “We Have to Keep Inventors Inventing”

Jacob Rabinow, Chief Research Scientist, NBS (NIST), inventor who holds 226 patents
Jacob Rabinow, Chief Research Scientist, NBS (NIST), inventor who holds 226 patents

By Jacob Rabinow, Chief Research Engineer at the National Bureau of Standards (predecessor of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology), 1982

(The following throwback article appeared in Research Management, precursor to our award-winning journal Research-Technology Management, in November 1982. This article was taken from testimony Rabinow gave as part of a panel of speakers before the U.S. Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight, House Committee on Science and Technology, in 1981.)

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The Challenges of Intellectual Property

By RTM guest editors Irene J. Petrick, Thierry Rayna, and Ludmila Striukova

The pursuit of intellectual property (IP) that can be protected through patents, copyrights, and trademarks has traditionally formed the cornerstone of many companies’ strategies. The general rule of thumb is that IP, when it is well managed, yields sustainable competitive advantage. Recently, however, patent trolls—companies or individuals that buy up patents in bulk—have used as a weapon the very IP that was supposed to protect companies’ core inventions and provide competitive advantage. Wielding their IP ownership, these trolls have blocked its application in new innovations.

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The present and future of innovation according to today’s practitioners

The official journal of the Industrial Research Institute, Research-Technology Management (RTM), released its March-April 2013 issue last Friday with a concentration on evidence-based innovation and its future. In his From the Editor column, Jim Euchnar, Editor-in-Chief at RTM, discusses “The Nature and Uses of Evidence,” as a guideline for how each article in this issue approaches specific elements of innovation and R&D. “Conducting evidence-based research on innovation is more difficult in practice than it may appear,” writes Euchnar, “but it is possible. This issue includes examples that illustrate the varieties of evidence that can work for practitioners.”

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